A home business (or "home-based business" or "HBB") is a small business that operates from the business owner's home office. In addition to location, home businesses are usually defined by having a very small number of employees, usually all immediate family of the business owner, in which case it is also a family business. Home businesses generally lack shop frontage, customer parking and street advertising signs. Such businesses are sometimes prohibited by residential zoning regulations.[1]
The problems were analyzed and confronted in two ways. In 1980 the National Alliance of Homebased Businesswomen was founded to combat the isolation expressed by the respondents as well as to fight the laws which made conducting their businesses difficult.[6][7][8][9] Then Women Working Home: The Homebased Guide and Directory by Marion Behr and Wendy Lazar was published.[10] It contained the stories of many women who ran home-based businesses throughout the country in many diverse fields, as well as information on business formation, conduct and compliance with the law. It sold 50,000 copies. During this time many national magazines wrote about these issues.[11][12][13][14][15] At the White House Conference on Small Business in 1986, one of the major resolutions was a recommendation favoring lifting restrictions on home-based business.[16]

... For example, only five academic papers explicitly investigate HBB owner motivations (see Walker, 2003; Jurik, 1998; 2004; Mason et al., 2011; Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004) with three further contributions from practitioner papers (see Enterprise Nation, 2009; Dwelly et al., 2005; British Telecommunications, 2008). This may be because when considering motivations, the HBB has been likened to self-employment and small business, with Thompson et al. (2009) reporting for their all-female sample of business owner-operators that motivations are similar irrespective of business location. ...
... Beaucoup de critères d'analyse ont été utilisés pour étudier les PME « particulières » ou « extraordinaires » (Welter et al., 2017) : par exemple le niveau de dépenses de R&D (entreprises de haute technologie [Hirsch-Kreinsen et Jacobson, 2008]) ; l'âge de l'entreprise (des entre-prises en démarrage [Birley et Westhead, 1993 ;Gatewood, Shaver et Gartner, 1995]) ; le type de propriété (entreprises familiales [Fernández et Nieto, 2005 ; Basco et Pérez Rodríguez, 2009]) ; la localisation (les entreprises à domicile [Thompson, Jones-Evans et Kwong, 2009 ;Mason, Carter et Tagg, 2011]), ou le but pour lequel elles ont été créées (entreprises sociales [Shaw et Carter, 2007]). ...
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