... In addition, although gender has been the primary focus of a significant proportion of HBB research (e.g. Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004; Walker et al., 2008; Thompson et al., 2009), it was not the focus of this research; thus, equal numbers of male and female participants were included, facilitated by the purposive intensity sample approach. Urban/rural classifications were based on Scottish Government guidelines where urban is a settlement of 10,000 or more (The Scottish Government, 2013). ...
... To encourage full-time self-employment, which may be particularly relevant for stimulating economic growth (Sautet, 2013;Williams and McGuire, 2010), policy- makers should consider facilitating societal practices related to future orientation and discouraging societal practices related to uncertainty avoidance and institutional collectivism. However, these activities may be neither necessary nor appropriate to also stimulate self-employment activity on a part-time basis, which can be particularly suited to increasing welfare for specific groups of indi- viduals, such as homemakers ( Strohmeyer et al., 2006;Weber and Schaper, 2004) and home-based entrepreneurs ( Thompson et al., 2009;Vorley and Rodgers, 2012). Societal institutional collectivism and uncertainty avoidance are negatively associated with entrepreneurial activity; performance orientation practices are positively associated with entrepreneurial activity. ...
... Amongst these few, British Telecommunications (2008) report that 58% of those operating an HBB in their sample claimed the desire for a better WLB as their primary motivation. Similar reports are found else- where: Stoner et al (1990) and Thompson et al (2009), for example, both focus exclusively on female-owned HBBs and find that the flexibility and autonomy associated with HBB ownership positively affects WLB. Control over time, and in some cases including reduced working hours, were other benefits identified by Thompson et al (2009). ...
Frauen und heimbasiertes UnternehmertumNachweise aus Groβbritannien Piers Thompson University of Wales Institute, Cardiff, Groβbritannien Dylan Jones-Evans University of Wales, Groβbritannien Caleb Kwong Universität Essex, Groβbritannien Frauen erhalten durch ein eigenes, heimbasiertes Unternehmen die Flexibilität, die es ihnen ermöglicht, familiäre Verantwortung und Berufstätigkeit zu vereinbaren. Dies geschieht jedoch oft auf Kosten von Unternehmensleistung und — wachstum. Mit Daten aus der ,Global Entrepreneurship Monitor'-Umfrage in Großbritannien untersucht diese Arbeit die Charaktereigenschaften dieser selbstständigen Frauen, die ihre Unternehmen von zu Hause aus führen. Ergebnisse zeigen, dass ein großer Teil der Frauen, die ein Unternehmen von zu Hause aus führen, über eher weniger unternehmerische Ressourcen verfügen, was darauf hinweist, dass diese Entscheidung eher aufgrund von Umständen getroffen wird. Diese Untersuchung ergab auch, dass solche Unternehmen eher in Teilzeit geführt werden, und so weiter zu ihrer Marginalität beitragen.
... For example, only five academic papers explicitly investigate HBB owner motivations (see Walker, 2003; Jurik, 1998; 2004; Mason et al., 2011; Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004) with three further contributions from practitioner papers (see Enterprise Nation, 2009; Dwelly et al., 2005; British Telecommunications, 2008). This may be because when considering motivations, the HBB has been likened to self-employment and small business, with Thompson et al. (2009) reporting for their all-female sample of business owner-operators that motivations are similar irrespective of business location. ...

... Meanwhile, researchers have reached different results on the growth of women's HBBs. Some studies have found these kinds of businesses weak and with very limited motivation and potential for growth (Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004; Thompson et al., 2009). Yet, most studies conducted on women's HBBs have proved that they are completely serious and are growing across all sectors (Breen, 2010; Breen and Karanasios, 2010; Wynarczyk and Graham, 2013;Clark and Douglas, 2014;Modarresi et al., 2016b). ...
... Entrepreneurship and location (ruralÀurban) Geographical location appears to be crucial in explaining entrepreneurship development. Empirical pieces of evidence show that higher competition, increase in population resulting higher population density, higher demand for goods and services, etc., result in higher entrepreneurship opportunities (Sorenson and Audia 2000; Reynolds et al. 2002; Shane 2003; Sternberg 2009). Studies found that the growth of entrepreneurship in the urban areas is much higher than that of rural areas (Shane 2003; Glaeser, Rosenthal, and Strange 2010). ...

Home-Based Business: A home based business could fit under the category of small business, but the primary factor in this case is that it's run from home, as opposed to an office or other location. But just because a business is run from home, doesn't mean it can't compete with larger businesses. In fact, many large corporations were started from a home, including Apple and Disney. 


Any ideas for me? Am disabled physically/mentally …I had a side job stuffing envelopes..My boss was so thrilled with me and my partner he fired a bunch of workers as we could pull off the bulk of his work!…We got paid well when the economy went upside down we noticed our pay decreased but still made enough to pay 3 house bills. Since about 6 months ago my boss I think lost his house …I remeber his last visit he was so stressed saying he almost had 2 foreclose emergencies:(

Focus - It's easy in this fast paced, constant info-in-your-face world to get distracted. This is especially true for business start-ups that often get side-tracked by the shiny object syndrome (i.e. products and services that promise fast results), or bogged down in unimportant busy work. Successful entrepreneurs are focused on what will bring results.


... To encourage full-time self-employment, which may be particularly relevant for stimulating economic growth (Sautet, 2013;Williams and McGuire, 2010), policy- makers should consider facilitating societal practices related to future orientation and discouraging societal practices related to uncertainty avoidance and institutional collectivism. However, these activities may be neither necessary nor appropriate to also stimulate self-employment activity on a part-time basis, which can be particularly suited to increasing welfare for specific groups of indi- viduals, such as homemakers ( Strohmeyer et al., 2006;Weber and Schaper, 2004) and home-based entrepreneurs ( Thompson et al., 2009;Vorley and Rodgers, 2012). Societal institutional collectivism and uncertainty avoidance are negatively associated with entrepreneurial activity; performance orientation practices are positively associated with entrepreneurial activity. ...
... Meanwhile, researchers have demonstrated different results on the growth of women's HBBs. Some studies have found these kinds of businesses weak and with a very limited motivation and potential for growth (Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004;Thompson et al., 2009), whereas other studies have proved that they are very dedicated and expanding in all sectors (Breen and Karanasios, 2010;Breen, 2010;Wynarczyk and Graham, 2013;Clark and Douglas, 2014). Motivations are among important gender differences in HBBs and while men often choose HBBs as a response to special life circumstances (e.g. ...
... Home-based business are also said to have lower growth ambitions than other firms and are likely to have few or no employees (Thompson et al. 2009; Newbery & Bosworth 2010). There is much assertion throughout the limited literature that motivations for starting home-based bsuinesses are based on the flexibility they afford in terms of work-life balance (Baines & Gelder 2003; Thompson et al. 2009), including balancing work and domestic commitments, often cited as particularly suited to working mothers (Loscocco & Smith-Hunter 2004; Ekinsmyth 2011). Alternatively, Soldressen et al. (1998) and Newbery and Bosworth (2010) argue that low barriers to entry in terms of costs and resources are key motivators for home-based business. ...

The concept of home-based business, as opposed to the previous terminology of "cottage industry", first appeared in 1978. The phrase was coined by Marion Behr, the originator of a study to find out what businesses women throughout America were carrying on in their homes. The preview edition of Enterprising Women[3] wrote about the search to gather information pertaining to home workers throughout the nation. Numerous magazines[4][5] and organizations helped to disseminate information regarding the study. Ultimately 40,000 letters were received, many indicating the problems the respondents experienced while carrying on businesses from their homes.
Do you love woodworking? Even without a huge workshop, you can create some of the more popular crafts and sell them.  And like most things, your success in business isn’t necessarily related to how skilled you are as a woodworker. So if you can figure out which products consumers want and just create those, you could have a good business plan.  Etsy.com and farmers’ markets are a great place to start selling.
Email Marketing: Email can be an effective way to maintain a connection between your business and its customers. You can purchase email addresses of customers and prospective customers, but the best results usually come from emails collected on your website. You can entice people to give you their emails through a quality free offer, such as a downloadable resource, called a lead magnet. Once you have their email, you can send a newsletter, special offers, and other information your target market would be interested in—as long as you follow laws and regulations around email marketing.
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