... In fact, some employees who work most of their time from home are paid low wages although there are also high earners among this group of workers (Felstead et al., 2002). For the self-employed, there is good evidence of the low earnings of homeworking women compared to self-employed women for whom most of the activity is performed outside of their homes, while no penalty of homeworking on earnings among self-employed men could be found (Simon and McDonald Way, 2015; see also Thompson et al., 2009). ...
Great ideas! I’ve been thinking about starting a home-based business for years but I just never stopped long enough to actually start and I didn’t know what kind of business to pursue. Now I’m ready to get started and you gave me some really good ideas. I really appreciate the links to more information on how to get started in several of these business opportunities. I will definitely look into them.
... In developing countries, commercialized handicraft production is classified as a traditional skill-based activities of a primary producer (artisan) like hand weaving, hand knitting, wood carving or ceramics painting that produce a pretty trinket hand-made items for products in the categories of gifts, house-ware items, home furnishings and fashion goods, that reach the local and foreign market through a number of intermediaries [8]. Previous studies of the factors relating to the management of a small enterprise, whether it is formal or informal production [9] [10], home-based or non-home based [11], or on a part-time or full-time status [12] contend that person's disposition (personality traits) and other external factors in person's surroundings (e.g supportive upbringing, financial situation, family and friends, networking, government support) might have an impact on their performance. So far, it is often assumed that higher performing enterprises are more likely to be operated from formal dedicated premises, with full-time employees, well-planned marketing activities and accounting tasks, whereas part-time and home-based businesses are likely to be smaller in scale, less formally managed and achieving lower revenues [11]. ...
... To encourage full-time self-employment, which may be particularly relevant for stimulating economic growth (Sautet, 2013;Williams and McGuire, 2010), policy- makers should consider facilitating societal practices related to future orientation and discouraging societal practices related to uncertainty avoidance and institutional collectivism. However, these activities may be neither necessary nor appropriate to also stimulate self-employment activity on a part-time basis, which can be particularly suited to increasing welfare for specific groups of indi- viduals, such as homemakers ( Strohmeyer et al., 2006;Weber and Schaper, 2004) and home-based entrepreneurs ( Thompson et al., 2009;Vorley and Rodgers, 2012). Societal institutional collectivism and uncertainty avoidance are negatively associated with entrepreneurial activity; performance orientation practices are positively associated with entrepreneurial activity. ...
... Knowledge-workers use the home as their work location (McDermott, 2005), despite it being often dismissed as limiting network and growth potential (Mason, 2010), with perceived gender links (Mirchandani, 1998(Mirchandani, , 1999), even for 'high-tech' ventures (Wynarczyk and Graham, 2013). Despite a dearth of empirical studies, and regular calls for theoretical develop- ments around this phenomenon (e.g., Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004;Mason et al., 2011;Thompson et al., 2009;Walker and Webster, 2004), home-based, self-employed workers are absent from 'most existing research and theory-building' (Reuschke, 2015, p. 6). We fill this gap by analysing home-based, knowledge-workers' virtual, mental and career mobility; those physical/corporeal restrictions counter-balancing their remote, online home-working autonomy (Fraser and Gold, 2001;Koehne et al., 2012); and the tensions overlooked by extant paradox theorizing ( Smith and Lewis, 2011). ...

Bob Lotich is a Certified Educator in Personal Finance (CEPF®) and has over 10+ years experience writing about Biblical personal finance and is the best-selling author of 4 books including Managing Money God's Way and has been named a top 20 social influencer in personal finance. His writing has been featured on Forbes, The Huffington Post, Yahoo Finance, CBN, Crosswalk, Patheos and others. He has been a full-time writer since 2008 and loves uncovering financial wisdom in the Bible as well as discovering the best tools and strategies to help you put more money in your pocket.
Publicity: Getting your business featured on media outlets can be a great way to reach new customers, but connecting with the right people to make it happen can sometimes be difficult. You can always submit and post press releases for news and announcements from your business through online press release distribution services. While press releases can work, they can also be time-consuming and are often ignored. Another option that often produces better results is to sign up for media requests through Help A Reporter Out. Once you sign up, you'll receive emails listing requests for professional sources from media outlets, including newspapers, magazines, radio and TV programs, blogs, and podcasts.

... Home-based business are also said to have lower growth ambitions than other firms and are likely to have few or no employees (Thompson et al. 2009; Newbery & Bosworth 2010). There is much assertion throughout the limited literature that motivations for starting home-based bsuinesses are based on the flexibility they afford in terms of work-life balance (Baines & Gelder 2003; Thompson et al. 2009), including balancing work and domestic commitments, often cited as particularly suited to working mothers (Loscocco & Smith-Hunter 2004; Ekinsmyth 2011). Alternatively, Soldressen et al. (1998) and Newbery and Bosworth (2010) argue that low barriers to entry in terms of costs and resources are key motivators for home-based business. ...
... Knowledge-workers use the home as their work location (McDermott, 2005), despite it being often dismissed as limiting network and growth potential (Mason, 2010), with perceived gender links (Mirchandani, 1998(Mirchandani, , 1999), even for 'high-tech' ventures (Wynarczyk and Graham, 2013). Despite a dearth of empirical studies, and regular calls for theoretical develop- ments around this phenomenon (e.g., Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004;Mason et al., 2011;Thompson et al., 2009;Walker and Webster, 2004), home-based, self-employed workers are absent from 'most existing research and theory-building' (Reuschke, 2015, p. 6). We fill this gap by analysing home-based, knowledge-workers' virtual, mental and career mobility; those physical/corporeal restrictions counter-balancing their remote, online home-working autonomy (Fraser and Gold, 2001;Koehne et al., 2012); and the tensions overlooked by extant paradox theorizing ( Smith and Lewis, 2011). ...
... Studies from various locations do give us some information, though. In terms of industry, there appears to be some 2 concentration in business services (Soldressen et al. 1998; Loscocco & Smith-Hunter 2004), and several studies find home-based firms are started with low levels of initial capitalisation (Loscocco & Smith-Hunter 2004; Thompson et al. 2009). Home-based business are also said to have lower growth ambitions than other firms and are likely to have few or no employees (Thompson et al. 2009; Newbery & Bosworth 2010). ...

A home business (or "home-based business" or "HBB") is a small business that operates from the business owner's home office. In addition to location, home businesses are usually defined by having a very small number of employees, usually all immediate family of the business owner, in which case it is also a family business. Home businesses generally lack shop frontage, customer parking and street advertising signs. Such businesses are sometimes prohibited by residential zoning regulations.[1]


... The majority of home-based businesses in the UK and Australia are full-time businesses (Enterprise Nation, 2014;Mason et al., 2011;Walker, 2003), but home-based businesses are more likely to operate on a part-time basis than other businesses. Women that operate their business out of their home do so more often on a part-time basis than men ( Mason and Reuschke, 2015;Thompson et al., 2009). ...

... In fact, some employees who work most of their time from home are paid low wages although there are also high earners among this group of workers (Felstead et al., 2002). For the self-employed, there is good evidence of the low earnings of homeworking women compared to self-employed women for whom most of the activity is performed outside of their homes, while no penalty of homeworking on earnings among self-employed men could be found (Simon and McDonald Way, 2015; see also Thompson et al., 2009). ...

... Meanwhile, researchers have demonstrated different results on the growth of women's HBBs. Some studies have found these kinds of businesses weak and with a very limited motivation and potential for growth (Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004;Thompson et al., 2009), whereas other studies have proved that they are very dedicated and expanding in all sectors (Breen and Karanasios, 2010;Breen, 2010;Wynarczyk and Graham, 2013;Clark and Douglas, 2014). Motivations are among important gender differences in HBBs and while men often choose HBBs as a response to special life circumstances (e.g. ...
... 'Lifestyle' HBB can be either 'growth-rejecting' or 'growth-enthusiastic' but Lewis (2008) argues that actually they should be seen as engaging in a 'freestyle' modus operandi as lifestyle is not something accommodated by the businesses but is rather a conditioning factor in the business operations. It appears from the research that HBB set up by women are more likely to be financially marginal as they are more likely to be operated parttime , and be started because of circumstances rather than their entrepreneurial skill sets (Thompson, Jones-Evans, & Kwong, 2009). Nevertheless HBB are a popular choice for women with family obligations as even with less financial success, role conflict between work and family tends to be lessened (Loscocco & SmithHunter, 2004). ...
The prospect of working from home has gained credibility over the years. Home offices can now compete with small commercial businesses and save on rent in the process. It may also be possible to tax deduct some of your home expenses while running a home based business.[2] Faxes, high speed internet connections, dedicated home telephone lines, and cell phones help to make a home-based business a reality. Earlier home businesses had been where families lived on the second floor of their house while converting the first floor into a store, where upon close of business they would secure the first floor and retire to the upper floors. This type of home business is still done in some rural areas. Many home businesses are started off in a much smaller capacity whilst the owner is still employed elsewhere, and then expanded once they are proven to be profitable.
But you don't have to be huge or famous to be a successful entrepreneur. The world is littered with entrepreneurs you never heard of who had an idea and turned it into a thriving, profitable business. There are moms who invented a gadget or started a lifestyle blog. Teenagers who star in their own YouTube shows. Retired folks who have turned a lifetime of experience into coaching or consulting business. Becoming an entrepreneur isn't hard, but it is work and requires many steps including:
... To some extent, business processes that enable women to participate in home-based entrepreneurial ventures overcome these barriers . Thus, in contrast to developed countries where homebased working offers poor returns (Thompson et al. 2009), home working offers a solution to restrictions on women's mobility, family responsibilities and a route out of poverty. In Muslim countries, women are considered the repository of family honour, and their chastity and good reputation are valued and guarded (Shaheed 1990). ...
This is a man who on our first envelope job bought us our furnace gas heater by paying us upfront half the money he would have topay when the job was done. He was so concerned we had no heat he paid us before we even started writing out the envelopes…I felt so bad to see when I called him 2 months ago someone answered it but was not him or his family. I fear he lost his home:( If he hasn’t we would still be in the back of his mind for envelope work knowing we are his people to get the job done.

How Much of this Guide Should You Read? This guide is designed for you to read cover-to-cover. Each new guide builds upon the previous one. A core idea that we want to reinforce is that marketing should be evaluated holistically. What you need to do is this in terms of growth frameworks and systems as opposed to campaigns. Reading this guide from start to finish will help you connect the many moving parts of marketing to your big-picture goal, which is ROI.
×