... The first group believes that women go for HBBs because they have no other alternatives. Therefore, as the house is used as a business location, the growth of their business has been limited; their activity is thoroughly made marginal, because less time is used for the business; its survival is even under question ( Thompson et al., 2009), but Breen and Karanasios (2010) believe that managerial qualifications and access to capital and marketing skills make women-owned HBBs grow. Of course, there are significant gender differences at work in HBBs ( Holmes et al., 1997). ...
... In developing countries, commercialized handicraft production is classified as a traditional skill-based activities of a primary producer (artisan) like hand weaving, hand knitting, wood carving or ceramics painting that produce a pretty trinket hand-made items for products in the categories of gifts, house-ware items, home furnishings and fashion goods, that reach the local and foreign market through a number of intermediaries [8]. Previous studies of the factors relating to the management of a small enterprise, whether it is formal or informal production [9] [10], home-based or non-home based [11], or on a part-time or full-time status [12] contend that person's disposition (personality traits) and other external factors in person's surroundings (e.g supportive upbringing, financial situation, family and friends, networking, government support) might have an impact on their performance. So far, it is often assumed that higher performing enterprises are more likely to be operated from formal dedicated premises, with full-time employees, well-planned marketing activities and accounting tasks, whereas part-time and home-based businesses are likely to be smaller in scale, less formally managed and achieving lower revenues [11]. ...
I like these ideas! Besides being good ideas in themselves, they stimulate MORE ideas! Some of them reminded me of something I was reading about called Craigslist arbitrage – buying low and selling high on craigslist, kind of like the first part of the old Oregon Trail game, but with washers and dryers and bicycles instead of cases of crackers and horses. Sounds like fun!  Anyway, that one about the pooper-scooper business, that works, I know because I was quite successful in the pooper-scooper service I started back in 1988! I’ve been in the industry for 25 years now, though I don’t go out and scoop any more.

... Similar reports are found else- where: Stoner et al (1990) and Thompson et al (2009), for example, both focus exclusively on female-owned HBBs and find that the flexibility and autonomy associated with HBB ownership positively affects WLB. Control over time, and in some cases including reduced working hours, were other benefits identified by Thompson et al (2009). Alternatively, other research reports that HBBs are not a solution to WLB issues. ...


Content Marketing: Writing articles or blog posts related to your business and submitting them to be published on other websites is another great way to reach your target market for free. Although mass distribution of a single article across the web doesn't have the same SEO benefits it once had, submitting exclusive articles to a specific site can still reap many rewards including SEO, boosting your credibility, and reaching a market that might not otherwise know about you. Because writing can be time-consuming, you may want to consider how you can repurpose what you write into other forms of content or with new angles for other audiences.
... Amongst these few, British Telecommunications (2008) report that 58% of those operating an HBB in their sample claimed the desire for a better WLB as their primary motivation. Similar reports are found else- where: Stoner et al (1990) and Thompson et al (2009), for example, both focus exclusively on female-owned HBBs and find that the flexibility and autonomy associated with HBB ownership positively affects WLB. Control over time, and in some cases including reduced working hours, were other benefits identified by Thompson et al (2009). ...
... In addition, although gender has been the primary focus of a significant proportion of HBB research (e.g. Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004; Walker et al., 2008; Thompson et al., 2009), it was not the focus of this research; thus, equal numbers of male and female participants were included, facilitated by the purposive intensity sample approach. Urban/rural classifications were based on Scottish Government guidelines where urban is a settlement of 10,000 or more (The Scottish Government, 2013). ...
... Meanwhile, researchers have reached different results on the growth of women's HBBs. Some studies have found these kinds of businesses weak and with very limited motivation and potential for growth (Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004; Thompson et al., 2009). Yet, most studies conducted on women's HBBs have proved that they are completely serious and are growing across all sectors (Breen, 2010; Breen and Karanasios, 2010; Wynarczyk and Graham, 2013;Clark and Douglas, 2014;Modarresi et al., 2016b). ...

... Women (with and without dependent children) of this business type are distributed fairly equally across urban and rural areas. It is striking that a higher proportion of these businesses than home-based businesses on average had increased their turnover in the previous two years, which contradicts the view that 'mumpreneur' businesses are of marginal relevance in terms of turnover and value added (Thompson et al. 2009). The second distinct group of business owners run the business from home because of their own illness or disability or care of an elderly or disabled person. ...


Focus - It's easy in this fast paced, constant info-in-your-face world to get distracted. This is especially true for business start-ups that often get side-tracked by the shiny object syndrome (i.e. products and services that promise fast results), or bogged down in unimportant busy work. Successful entrepreneurs are focused on what will bring results.
Good ideas, I like numbers 2, 3, and 6 personally. I think in addition to persistence and determination, creating a successful home-based business also takes courage. It can be a scary proposition to quit your day job to go it alone. I always admire people who make this move, and I think that in general they are all the more happy for it. There is not doubt, though, that you have to go for it 100% in order to make it happen!
... The majority of home-based businesses in the UK and Australia are full-time businesses (Enterprise Nation, 2014;Mason et al., 2011;Walker, 2003), but home-based businesses are more likely to operate on a part-time basis than other businesses. Women that operate their business out of their home do so more often on a part-time basis than men ( Mason and Reuschke, 2015;Thompson et al., 2009). ...
How Much of this Guide Should You Read? This guide is designed for you to read cover-to-cover. Each new guide builds upon the previous one. A core idea that we want to reinforce is that marketing should be evaluated holistically. What you need to do is this in terms of growth frameworks and systems as opposed to campaigns. Reading this guide from start to finish will help you connect the many moving parts of marketing to your big-picture goal, which is ROI.
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