Home-Based Business: A home based business could fit under the category of small business, but the primary factor in this case is that it's run from home, as opposed to an office or other location. But just because a business is run from home, doesn't mean it can't compete with larger businesses. In fact, many large corporations were started from a home, including Apple and Disney. 
The problems were analyzed and confronted in two ways. In 1980 the National Alliance of Homebased Businesswomen was founded to combat the isolation expressed by the respondents as well as to fight the laws which made conducting their businesses difficult.[6][7][8][9] Then Women Working Home: The Homebased Guide and Directory by Marion Behr and Wendy Lazar was published.[10] It contained the stories of many women who ran home-based businesses throughout the country in many diverse fields, as well as information on business formation, conduct and compliance with the law. It sold 50,000 copies. During this time many national magazines wrote about these issues.[11][12][13][14][15] At the White House Conference on Small Business in 1986, one of the major resolutions was a recommendation favoring lifting restrictions on home-based business.[16]
Your social media strategy is more than just a Facebook profile or Twitter feed. When executed correctly, social media is a powerful customer engagement engine and web traffic driver. It’s easy to get sucked into the hype and create profiles on every single social site. This is the wrong approach. What you should do instead is to focus on a few key channels where your brand is most likely to reach key customers and prospects. This post will teach you how to make that judgment call. Get Started

... A more recent study by Tlaiss (2013) finds that rather than either push or pull motivational factors, women entrepreneurs demonstrate a complex interplay of both types of motivation. Other gendered aspects include lifestyle strategies for balancing work and home-life (Breen, 2009/10; Philipps, 2008; Duberley and Carrigan, 2013), feelings of isolation (Greenhaus et al., 2003; Thompson et al., 2009), attitudes to IT (Ndubisi, 2008) and attitudes to growth (Ehlers and Main, 1998; Breen and Karanasios, 2010; Redmond and Walker, 2009/10). We suggest that many of the contradictions of gendered aspects arise from the confounding of different types of home-based business, and would encourage researchers to focus on particular business types, such as our focus on home-based online businesses and the development of the detailed typology shown in Table 1We also suggest that the ease of experimentation offered by the online environment provides an explanation for the low levels of self-efficacy we identified. ...
... For instance, some may resort to part-time rather than full-time self-employment to establish and run a social venture ( Austin et al., 2006;Korsgaard and Anderson, 2011). Others may favour this form of self-employment to jointly set up and operate a business with family members ( Baines and Wheelock, 1998;Fletcher, 2010), to work from home while caring for children and family (Thompson et al., 2009;Vorley and Rodgers, 2012) or to delay entry into full-time entrepreneurship (Folta et al., 2010). Although we recognised such arguments when portraying full-and part-time self-employment and developing our hypotheses, we leave it to future research to assess the relationship between societal culture and particular types of part-time entrepreneurship in more detail. ...

... Studies from various locations do give us some information, though. In terms of industry, there appears to be some 2 concentration in business services (Soldressen et al. 1998; Loscocco & Smith-Hunter 2004), and several studies find home-based firms are started with low levels of initial capitalisation (Loscocco & Smith-Hunter 2004; Thompson et al. 2009). Home-based business are also said to have lower growth ambitions than other firms and are likely to have few or no employees (Thompson et al. 2009; Newbery & Bosworth 2010). ...

... To illustrate, three empirical studies are described, though this is not exhaustive. First, Thompson et al. (2009) use Global Entrepreneurship Monitor data, basing their measurement of HBB on nascent and start-up activities in the home. Elsewhere, Felstead et al. (2000) base their study on the 1998 Labour Force Survey that explores those who work mainly, sometimes or partially at home (both employed and self-employed), thus not separating employment and self-employment status. ...

... In terms of industry, there appears to be some 2 concentration in business services (Soldressen et al. 1998; Loscocco & Smith-Hunter 2004), and several studies find home-based firms are started with low levels of initial capitalisation (Loscocco & Smith-Hunter 2004; Thompson et al. 2009). Home-based business are also said to have lower growth ambitions than other firms and are likely to have few or no employees (Thompson et al. 2009; Newbery & Bosworth 2010). There is much assertion throughout the limited literature that motivations for starting home-based bsuinesses are based on the flexibility they afford in terms of work-life balance (Baines & Gelder 2003; Thompson et al. 2009), including balancing work and domestic commitments, often cited as particularly suited to working mothers (Loscocco & Smith-Hunter 2004; Ekinsmyth 2011). ...


... The literature comes to very different conclusions with respect to the 'success' and growth ambitions of women HBB entrepreneurs. Some conclude that these businesses operate at the margins and struggle to survive (Thompson et al. 2009), while others found that home-based women owners were highly educated and made large sales (Loscocco and Smith-Hunter 2004). Home-based businesses are often regarded as 'lifestyle' businesses through which the owner translates a 'hobby' into a business idea (Newbery and Bosworth 2010). ...
Great ideas! I’ve been thinking about starting a home-based business for years but I just never stopped long enough to actually start and I didn’t know what kind of business to pursue. Now I’m ready to get started and you gave me some really good ideas. I really appreciate the links to more information on how to get started in several of these business opportunities. I will definitely look into them.

The articles on this site should not be taken as financial advice. Please contact a Christian financial planner (or coach) for specific advice regarding your situation. Any references to interest rates, giveaways, deals, products, and websites are subject to change without notice. We try our best to keep the information current, but things are always changing so it may be different now than when it was first published. Also, all the pages on SeedTime help us pay the bills by using affiliate relationships with Amazon, Google, eBay and others but our opinions are NEVER for sale. Find out more here.


Serial Entrepreneur: Many entrepreneurs get the most joy out of starting and building a business, but not in its continued management, so they sell it to launch a new idea. They are still considered entrepreneurs because they operate and assume risk in the business for the time they own it. Other times, serial entrepreneurs juggle several businesses at once, earning multiple streams of income.
Content marketing is more than just blogging. When executed correctly, content including articles, guides (like this one), webinars, and videos can be powerful growth drivers for your business. Focus on building trust and producing amazing quality. And most of all, make sure that you’re capturing the right metrics. Create content to generate ROI. Measure the right results. This guide will teach you how. Get Started
×