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... Entrepreneurship and location (ruralÀurban) Geographical location appears to be crucial in explaining entrepreneurship development. Empirical pieces of evidence show that higher competition, increase in population resulting higher population density, higher demand for goods and services, etc., result in higher entrepreneurship opportunities (Sorenson and Audia 2000; Reynolds et al. 2002; Shane 2003; Sternberg 2009). Studies found that the growth of entrepreneurship in the urban areas is much higher than that of rural areas (Shane 2003; Glaeser, Rosenthal, and Strange 2010). ...
Good ideas, I like numbers 2, 3, and 6 personally. I think in addition to persistence and determination, creating a successful home-based business also takes courage. It can be a scary proposition to quit your day job to go it alone. I always admire people who make this move, and I think that in general they are all the more happy for it. There is not doubt, though, that you have to go for it 100% in order to make it happen!
Great post. My husband has been selling used books on-line for 10 years…It’s not enough to fully support our family of 6, but it does afford us a lot of flexibility. We both work other odds and ends spot jobs and it ends up working out. We have also had the flexibility to be volunteer managers at a church camp in the summer. (Right now the camp can not afford a manager) I’m pioneering a women’s conference and event ministry. I’ve always been very greatful for the freedom we have. My husband helps at the kids schools, apointments are easy to make, and the stress is less. It’s been a sacrifice in some ways but worth the gains in time and flexibility for sure.
Your customers, prospects, and partners are the lifeblood of of your business. You need to build your marketing strategy around them. Step 1 of marketing is understanding what your customers want, which can be challenging when you’re dealing with such a diverse audience. This guide will walk you through (1) the process of building personal connections at scale and (2) crafting customer value propositions that funnel back to ROI for your company. Get Started
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