... For instance, some may resort to part-time rather than full-time self-employment to establish and run a social venture ( Austin et al., 2006;Korsgaard and Anderson, 2011). Others may favour this form of self-employment to jointly set up and operate a business with family members ( Baines and Wheelock, 1998;Fletcher, 2010), to work from home while caring for children and family (Thompson et al., 2009;Vorley and Rodgers, 2012) or to delay entry into full-time entrepreneurship (Folta et al., 2010). Although we recognised such arguments when portraying full-and part-time self-employment and developing our hypotheses, we leave it to future research to assess the relationship between societal culture and particular types of part-time entrepreneurship in more detail. ...

... Though female entrepreneurship in the informal sector concentrates around small size and low growth activities, it provides the opportunity to earn money which further strengthens women's economic status and ultimately women empowerment (Welter and Smallbone, 2008 ). Moreover, evidence shows that about half of females engaged in self-employment/microentrepreneurship take it as part-time activity and operated within home (Thompson et al. 2009) that provide them work flexibility to mitigate the household responsibilities (Duberley and Carrigan 2013 ). Thus selfemployment/micro-entrepreneurship in the non-farm informal sector may be portrayed in substituting such parttime employment (Georgellis and Wall 2005; Saridakis et al. 2014) and it can be possible to witness a reverse scenario that female may be more interested than male to engage in self-employment or micro-entrepreneurial activities in the female intensive sectors. ...


... Women (with and without dependent children) of this business type are distributed fairly equally across urban and rural areas. It is striking that a higher proportion of these businesses than home-based businesses on average had increased their turnover in the previous two years, which contradicts the view that 'mumpreneur' businesses are of marginal relevance in terms of turnover and value added (Thompson et al. 2009). The second distinct group of business owners run the business from home because of their own illness or disability or care of an elderly or disabled person. ...
Lifestyle Entrepreneur: Although the idea of lifestyle entrepreneur isn't new, it's gained in popularity with the rise of technology, the Internet, and a global economy. A lifestyle entrepreneur is one that builds a business that incorporates their interests and passions, and sustains their life goals. Many in this category are referred to as digital nomads because they often have online businesses that allow them to travel. However travel isn't necessary to be lifestyle entrepreneur. The key factor in a lifestyle entrepreneur is that they do what they love, and/or the business supports their chosen lifestyle.
Social Media Marketing: In an increasingly connected world where consumers expect the companies they do business with to engage with them, social media is an ideal way to interact with prospects and customers. The key to social media marketing success is focusing on the platforms where you're most likely to find your target market, whether it's Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, or Pinterest. To make sure you're not wasting time with your social media efforts, develop a strategy and content plan, and research tools that will help make the posting easier, such as Hootsuite or Buffer.
Do you love woodworking? Even without a huge workshop, you can create some of the more popular crafts and sell them.  And like most things, your success in business isn’t necessarily related to how skilled you are as a woodworker. So if you can figure out which products consumers want and just create those, you could have a good business plan.  Etsy.com and farmers’ markets are a great place to start selling.
Serial Entrepreneur: Many entrepreneurs get the most joy out of starting and building a business, but not in its continued management, so they sell it to launch a new idea. They are still considered entrepreneurs because they operate and assume risk in the business for the time they own it. Other times, serial entrepreneurs juggle several businesses at once, earning multiple streams of income.
In my experience, one of the greatest challenges people face is deciding why they are starting a business, what they hope to accomplish and what they really want to do. Starting a business, particularly from home, sounds glamorous and free but, in reality, it can put a strain on home life if not done right. People I talk to often need help decision-making which is an essential quality in running a business.
Your social media strategy is more than just a Facebook profile or Twitter feed. When executed correctly, social media is a powerful customer engagement engine and web traffic driver. It’s easy to get sucked into the hype and create profiles on every single social site. This is the wrong approach. What you should do instead is to focus on a few key channels where your brand is most likely to reach key customers and prospects. This post will teach you how to make that judgment call. Get Started
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