... Most prolific are studies based in the UK. These studies cover a range of research themes., including the effects of technology diffusion (Daniel et al., 2014;Ruiz and Walling, 2005); urban or rural con- text (Dwelly et al., 2005;Newbery and Bosworth, 2010;Reuschke and Mason, 2015); housing stock (Reuschke, 2016) and gender (Ekinsmyth, 2013;Thompson et al., 2009). Whatever the focus however, HBBs are largely treated as homogenous entities in empirical studies. ...
Great post. My husband has been selling used books on-line for 10 years…It’s not enough to fully support our family of 6, but it does afford us a lot of flexibility. We both work other odds and ends spot jobs and it ends up working out. We have also had the flexibility to be volunteer managers at a church camp in the summer. (Right now the camp can not afford a manager) I’m pioneering a women’s conference and event ministry. I’ve always been very greatful for the freedom we have. My husband helps at the kids schools, apointments are easy to make, and the stress is less. It’s been a sacrifice in some ways but worth the gains in time and flexibility for sure.

... Though female entrepreneurship in the informal sector concentrates around small size and low growth activities, it provides the opportunity to earn money which further strengthens women's economic status and ultimately women empowerment (Welter and Smallbone, 2008 ). Moreover, evidence shows that about half of females engaged in self-employment/microentrepreneurship take it as part-time activity and operated within home (Thompson et al. 2009) that provide them work flexibility to mitigate the household responsibilities (Duberley and Carrigan 2013 ). Thus selfemployment/micro-entrepreneurship in the non-farm informal sector may be portrayed in substituting such parttime employment (Georgellis and Wall 2005; Saridakis et al. 2014) and it can be possible to witness a reverse scenario that female may be more interested than male to engage in self-employment or micro-entrepreneurial activities in the female intensive sectors. ...
... In addition, although gender has been the primary focus of a significant proportion of HBB research (e.g. Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004; Walker et al., 2008; Thompson et al., 2009), it was not the focus of this research; thus, equal numbers of male and female participants were included, facilitated by the purposive intensity sample approach. Urban/rural classifications were based on Scottish Government guidelines where urban is a settlement of 10,000 or more (The Scottish Government, 2013). ...
Focus - It's easy in this fast paced, constant info-in-your-face world to get distracted. This is especially true for business start-ups that often get side-tracked by the shiny object syndrome (i.e. products and services that promise fast results), or bogged down in unimportant busy work. Successful entrepreneurs are focused on what will bring results.
... It would be desirable to explore more if handicraft producers could be grouped into a number of clusters or types of producer based on these three business characteristics. Previous literature on business transition led to proposition that the higher performing handicraft producers would be those exhibiting formal business activities in a dedicated premise (Thompson, Jones-Evans &Kwong, 2009; Roberts and Robinson, 2010). In addition, based on the key informant interviews conducted, according with Malaysian government policy the full-time workshop-based producers would be highest performing unlike part-time domestic producers, who it was expected would have weaker performance due to informal and improper management of their business activity. ...
I have a friend that is the city manager of a town of about 25,000 where his main task is processing requests for building permits. Actually a volunteer-type job, no salary. But he makes a bunch of contacts every day, and his address book is huge. So he is busy all year except the Holidays. To fill in this time he started a Christmas tree lighting service (houses, lawn ornaments, etc.). In this 3-month period he makes enough to keep him going the rest of the year.
Search engines are a powerful channel for connecting with new audiences. Companies like Google and Bing look to connect their customers with the best user experience possible. Step one of a strong SEO strategy is to make sure that your website content and products are the best that they can be. Step 2 is to communicate that user experience information to search engines so that you rank in the right place. SEO is competitive and has a reputation of being a black art. Here’s how to get started the right way. Get Started
×