... To illustrate, three empirical studies are described, though this is not exhaustive. First, Thompson et al. (2009) use Global Entrepreneurship Monitor data, basing their measurement of HBB on nascent and start-up activities in the home. Elsewhere, Felstead et al. (2000) base their study on the 1998 Labour Force Survey that explores those who work mainly, sometimes or partially at home (both employed and self-employed), thus not separating employment and self-employment status. ...
... To illustrate, three empirical studies are described, though this is not exhaustive. First, Thompson et al. (2009) use Global Entrepreneurship Monitor data, basing their measurement of HBB on nascent and start-up activities in the home. Elsewhere, Felstead et al. (2000) base their study on the 1998 Labour Force Survey that explores those who work mainly, sometimes or partially at home (both employed and self-employed), thus not separating employment and self-employment status. ...
Search engines are a powerful channel for connecting with new audiences. Companies like Google and Bing look to connect their customers with the best user experience possible. Step one of a strong SEO strategy is to make sure that your website content and products are the best that they can be. Step 2 is to communicate that user experience information to search engines so that you rank in the right place. SEO is competitive and has a reputation of being a black art. Here’s how to get started the right way. Get Started
Focus - It's easy in this fast paced, constant info-in-your-face world to get distracted. This is especially true for business start-ups that often get side-tracked by the shiny object syndrome (i.e. products and services that promise fast results), or bogged down in unimportant busy work. Successful entrepreneurs are focused on what will bring results.
... The majority of home-based businesses in the UK and Australia are full-time businesses (Enterprise Nation, 2014;Mason et al., 2011;Walker, 2003), but home-based businesses are more likely to operate on a part-time basis than other businesses. Women that operate their business out of their home do so more often on a part-time basis than men ( Mason and Reuschke, 2015;Thompson et al., 2009). ...
... Previous studies of the factors relating to the management of a small enterprise, whether it is formal or informal production [9] [10], home-based or non-home based [11], or on a part-time or full-time status [12] contend that person's disposition (personality traits) and other external factors in person's surroundings (e.g supportive upbringing, financial situation, family and friends, networking, government support) might have an impact on their performance. So far, it is often assumed that higher performing enterprises are more likely to be operated from formal dedicated premises, with full-time employees, well-planned marketing activities and accounting tasks, whereas part-time and home-based businesses are likely to be smaller in scale, less formally managed and achieving lower revenues [11]. Starting and surviving a business is influenced by various socio-economic contexts, whether the business is operated in rural or urban areas [9] [13]. ...
Hi, I really enjoyed this article. I think everyone has a skill they can market like being a VA, writing, web design etc for some extra cash. I think the main thing to consider when starting a business is if you can run the business with your day job. It’s great if you can build a service based business to work from home but it takes time to build these business to replace a wage – it took me three years. Great post!
... In developing countries, commercialized handicraft production is classified as a traditional skill-based activities of a primary producer (artisan) like hand weaving, hand knitting, wood carving or ceramics painting that produce a pretty trinket hand-made items for products in the categories of gifts, house-ware items, home furnishings and fashion goods, that reach the local and foreign market through a number of intermediaries [8]. Previous studies of the factors relating to the management of a small enterprise, whether it is formal or informal production [9] [10], home-based or non-home based [11], or on a part-time or full-time status [12] contend that person's disposition (personality traits) and other external factors in person's surroundings (e.g supportive upbringing, financial situation, family and friends, networking, government support) might have an impact on their performance. So far, it is often assumed that higher performing enterprises are more likely to be operated from formal dedicated premises, with full-time employees, well-planned marketing activities and accounting tasks, whereas part-time and home-based businesses are likely to be smaller in scale, less formally managed and achieving lower revenues [11]. ...

... In developing countries, commercialized handicraft production is classified as a traditional skill-based activities of a primary producer (artisan) like hand weaving, hand knitting, wood carving or ceramics painting that produce a pretty trinket hand-made items for products in the categories of gifts, house-ware items, home furnishings and fashion goods, that reach the local and foreign market through a number of intermediaries [8]. Previous studies of the factors relating to the management of a small enterprise, whether it is formal or informal production [9] [10], home-based or non-home based [11], or on a part-time or full-time status [12] contend that person's disposition (personality traits) and other external factors in person's surroundings (e.g supportive upbringing, financial situation, family and friends, networking, government support) might have an impact on their performance. So far, it is often assumed that higher performing enterprises are more likely to be operated from formal dedicated premises, with full-time employees, well-planned marketing activities and accounting tasks, whereas part-time and home-based businesses are likely to be smaller in scale, less formally managed and achieving lower revenues [11]. ...
... In developing countries, commercialized handicraft production is classified as a traditional skill-based activities of a primary producer (artisan) like hand weaving, hand knitting, wood carving or ceramics painting that produce a pretty trinket hand-made items for products in the categories of gifts, house-ware items, home furnishings and fashion goods, that reach the local and foreign market through a number of intermediaries [8]. Previous studies of the factors relating to the management of a small enterprise, whether it is formal or informal production [9] [10], home-based or non-home based [11], or on a part-time or full-time status [12] contend that person's disposition (personality traits) and other external factors in person's surroundings (e.g supportive upbringing, financial situation, family and friends, networking, government support) might have an impact on their performance. So far, it is often assumed that higher performing enterprises are more likely to be operated from formal dedicated premises, with full-time employees, well-planned marketing activities and accounting tasks, whereas part-time and home-based businesses are likely to be smaller in scale, less formally managed and achieving lower revenues [11]. ...
... Amongst these few, British Telecommunications (2008) report that 58% of those operating an HBB in their sample claimed the desire for a better WLB as their primary motivation. Similar reports are found else- where: Stoner et al (1990) and Thompson et al (2009), for example, both focus exclusively on female-owned HBBs and find that the flexibility and autonomy associated with HBB ownership positively affects WLB. Control over time, and in some cases including reduced working hours, were other benefits identified by Thompson et al (2009). ...
Home-Based Business: A home based business could fit under the category of small business, but the primary factor in this case is that it's run from home, as opposed to an office or other location. But just because a business is run from home, doesn't mean it can't compete with larger businesses. In fact, many large corporations were started from a home, including Apple and Disney. 
“The massage therapy business has been growing by leaps and bounds in the last decade, tripling in volume. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook, it should grow by an additional 20% through 2016, meaning this home business has strong potential for growth. And, because all in-home massage services are necessarily local in nature, it’s work that can’t be outsourced to another country.”
Great post. My husband has been selling used books on-line for 10 years…It’s not enough to fully support our family of 6, but it does afford us a lot of flexibility. We both work other odds and ends spot jobs and it ends up working out. We have also had the flexibility to be volunteer managers at a church camp in the summer. (Right now the camp can not afford a manager) I’m pioneering a women’s conference and event ministry. I’ve always been very greatful for the freedom we have. My husband helps at the kids schools, apointments are easy to make, and the stress is less. It’s been a sacrifice in some ways but worth the gains in time and flexibility for sure.
... For instance, some may resort to part-time rather than full-time self-employment to establish and run a social venture ( Austin et al., 2006;Korsgaard and Anderson, 2011). Others may favour this form of self-employment to jointly set up and operate a business with family members ( Baines and Wheelock, 1998;Fletcher, 2010), to work from home while caring for children and family (Thompson et al., 2009;Vorley and Rodgers, 2012) or to delay entry into full-time entrepreneurship (Folta et al., 2010). Although we recognised such arguments when portraying full-and part-time self-employment and developing our hypotheses, we leave it to future research to assess the relationship between societal culture and particular types of part-time entrepreneurship in more detail. ...
Email Marketing: Email can be an effective way to maintain a connection between your business and its customers. You can purchase email addresses of customers and prospective customers, but the best results usually come from emails collected on your website. You can entice people to give you their emails through a quality free offer, such as a downloadable resource, called a lead magnet. Once you have their email, you can send a newsletter, special offers, and other information your target market would be interested in—as long as you follow laws and regulations around email marketing.
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