The problems were analyzed and confronted in two ways. In 1980 the National Alliance of Homebased Businesswomen was founded to combat the isolation expressed by the respondents as well as to fight the laws which made conducting their businesses difficult.[6][7][8][9] Then Women Working Home: The Homebased Guide and Directory by Marion Behr and Wendy Lazar was published.[10] It contained the stories of many women who ran home-based businesses throughout the country in many diverse fields, as well as information on business formation, conduct and compliance with the law. It sold 50,000 copies. During this time many national magazines wrote about these issues.[11][12][13][14][15] At the White House Conference on Small Business in 1986, one of the major resolutions was a recommendation favoring lifting restrictions on home-based business.[16]
... In addition, although gender has been the primary focus of a significant proportion of HBB research (e.g. Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004; Walker et al., 2008; Thompson et al., 2009), it was not the focus of this research; thus, equal numbers of male and female participants were included, facilitated by the purposive intensity sample approach. Urban/rural classifications were based on Scottish Government guidelines where urban is a settlement of 10,000 or more (The Scottish Government, 2013). ...
... Previous studies of the factors relating to the management of a small enterprise, whether it is formal or informal production [9] [10], home-based or non-home based [11], or on a part-time or full-time status [12] contend that person's disposition (personality traits) and other external factors in person's surroundings (e.g supportive upbringing, financial situation, family and friends, networking, government support) might have an impact on their performance. So far, it is often assumed that higher performing enterprises are more likely to be operated from formal dedicated premises, with full-time employees, well-planned marketing activities and accounting tasks, whereas part-time and home-based businesses are likely to be smaller in scale, less formally managed and achieving lower revenues [11]. Starting and surviving a business is influenced by various socio-economic contexts, whether the business is operated in rural or urban areas [9] [13]. ...
... To encourage full-time self-employment, which may be particularly relevant for stimulating economic growth (Sautet, 2013;Williams and McGuire, 2010), policy- makers should consider facilitating societal practices related to future orientation and discouraging societal practices related to uncertainty avoidance and institutional collectivism. However, these activities may be neither necessary nor appropriate to also stimulate self-employment activity on a part-time basis, which can be particularly suited to increasing welfare for specific groups of indi- viduals, such as homemakers ( Strohmeyer et al., 2006;Weber and Schaper, 2004) and home-based entrepreneurs ( Thompson et al., 2009;Vorley and Rodgers, 2012). Societal institutional collectivism and uncertainty avoidance are negatively associated with entrepreneurial activity; performance orientation practices are positively associated with entrepreneurial activity. ...
Email Marketing: Email can be an effective way to maintain a connection between your business and its customers. You can purchase email addresses of customers and prospective customers, but the best results usually come from emails collected on your website. You can entice people to give you their emails through a quality free offer, such as a downloadable resource, called a lead magnet. Once you have their email, you can send a newsletter, special offers, and other information your target market would be interested in—as long as you follow laws and regulations around email marketing.
The concept of home-based business, as opposed to the previous terminology of "cottage industry", first appeared in 1978. The phrase was coined by Marion Behr, the originator of a study to find out what businesses women throughout America were carrying on in their homes. The preview edition of Enterprising Women[3] wrote about the search to gather information pertaining to home workers throughout the nation. Numerous magazines[4][5] and organizations helped to disseminate information regarding the study. Ultimately 40,000 letters were received, many indicating the problems the respondents experienced while carrying on businesses from their homes.
The problems were analyzed and confronted in two ways. In 1980 the National Alliance of Homebased Businesswomen was founded to combat the isolation expressed by the respondents as well as to fight the laws which made conducting their businesses difficult.[6][7][8][9] Then Women Working Home: The Homebased Guide and Directory by Marion Behr and Wendy Lazar was published.[10] It contained the stories of many women who ran home-based businesses throughout the country in many diverse fields, as well as information on business formation, conduct and compliance with the law. It sold 50,000 copies. During this time many national magazines wrote about these issues.[11][12][13][14][15] At the White House Conference on Small Business in 1986, one of the major resolutions was a recommendation favoring lifting restrictions on home-based business.[16]
Your customers, prospects, and partners are the lifeblood of of your business. You need to build your marketing strategy around them. Step 1 of marketing is understanding what your customers want, which can be challenging when you’re dealing with such a diverse audience. This guide will walk you through (1) the process of building personal connections at scale and (2) crafting customer value propositions that funnel back to ROI for your company. Get Started
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