A GEM (Global Entrepreneurship Monitor) a GERA (Global Entrepreneurship Research Association) konzorcium kutatási projektje. A projekt résztvevői a bostoni székhelyű Babson College, a London Business School és az egyes országok kutatási csoportjai, amelyek száma az alapítás óta folyamatosan nőtt. A konzorcium 1997-ben jött létre abból a célból, hogy a kutatásban résztvevő országok lakónak ... [Show full abstract]View full-text
But you don't have to be huge or famous to be a successful entrepreneur. The world is littered with entrepreneurs you never heard of who had an idea and turned it into a thriving, profitable business. There are moms who invented a gadget or started a lifestyle blog. Teenagers who star in their own YouTube shows. Retired folks who have turned a lifetime of experience into coaching or consulting business. Becoming an entrepreneur isn't hard, but it is work and requires many steps including:

... Amongst these few, British Telecommunications (2008) report that 58% of those operating an HBB in their sample claimed the desire for a better WLB as their primary motivation. Similar reports are found else- where: Stoner et al (1990) and Thompson et al (2009), for example, both focus exclusively on female-owned HBBs and find that the flexibility and autonomy associated with HBB ownership positively affects WLB. Control over time, and in some cases including reduced working hours, were other benefits identified by Thompson et al (2009). ...
... The literature comes to very different conclusions with respect to the 'success' and growth ambitions of women HBB entrepreneurs. Some conclude that these businesses operate at the margins and struggle to survive (Thompson et al. 2009), while others found that home-based women owners were highly educated and made large sales (Loscocco and Smith-Hunter 2004). Home-based businesses are often regarded as 'lifestyle' businesses through which the owner translates a 'hobby' into a business idea (Newbery and Bosworth 2010). ...
... In addition, flexibility is presented as a source of conflict that impedes growth ( Shelton 2006) that may even leads women not to pursue self-employment ( Greene et al. 2013). The quest for flexibility also means that women attach less value to business expansion ( Cliff 1998;Noseleit 2014), spend less time on their ventures ( Longstreth et al. 1987) and are pushed into working part-time from home ( Thompson et al. 2009). Although some studies contest the notion that the relationship between work and family must be a source of conflict ( Powell 2012, Özcan 2011;Marlow 1997), the implication persists that this is a "women's issue". ...
And don’t forget social media as a home-based business. Many churches, other non profit charities, and business owners NEED to advertise via social media. You can either be hired to do theirs or become a consultant who trains their staff. Many churches don’t know the Internet laws like an avid social media user does. They’ll need someone to teach them how to use social media and protect their organization while doing it. Ask me how I know. 😉 My husband and I have worked with some organizations who refused to listen and they ended up with some scandals. Take a gander at what happened to Pastor Alios Bell’s ministry reputation when someone who knows social media happened upon her indiscretion at Applebee’s. Google it. It went viral.

... Though female entrepreneurship in the informal sector concentrates around small size and low growth activities, it provides the opportunity to earn money which further strengthens women's economic status and ultimately women empowerment (Welter and Smallbone, 2008 ). Moreover, evidence shows that about half of females engaged in self-employment/microentrepreneurship take it as part-time activity and operated within home (Thompson et al. 2009) that provide them work flexibility to mitigate the household responsibilities (Duberley and Carrigan 2013 ). Thus selfemployment/micro-entrepreneurship in the non-farm informal sector may be portrayed in substituting such parttime employment (Georgellis and Wall 2005; Saridakis et al. 2014) and it can be possible to witness a reverse scenario that female may be more interested than male to engage in self-employment or micro-entrepreneurial activities in the female intensive sectors. ...
... Consistent with Brekke (2015) and Isaksen (2015), in the immediate aftermaths of conflict, the triple helix of chaos, unpredictable destruction of factor endowments and physical immobility does make the penurious environment even more resource-poor, diminishing the capabilities to engage in non-necessity-based economic activities and confining entrepreneurial individuals to path-continuation. Factors that were traditionally considered entrepreneurship enablers, such as education ( Thompson et al., 2009Thompson et al., , 2010), offer minimal additional advantage. However, contrary to our expectations, as entrepreneurial individuals immersed themselves into the new order, they recognised new entrepreneurial opportunities through renewing and creating new paths by efficiently reconfiguring the meagre resources towards new purposes. ...
How Much of this Guide Should You Read? This guide is designed for you to read cover-to-cover. Each new guide builds upon the previous one. A core idea that we want to reinforce is that marketing should be evaluated holistically. What you need to do is this in terms of growth frameworks and systems as opposed to campaigns. Reading this guide from start to finish will help you connect the many moving parts of marketing to your big-picture goal, which is ROI.
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