... Previous studies of the factors relating to the management of a small enterprise, whether it is formal or informal production [9] [10], home-based or non-home based [11], or on a part-time or full-time status [12] contend that person's disposition (personality traits) and other external factors in person's surroundings (e.g supportive upbringing, financial situation, family and friends, networking, government support) might have an impact on their performance. So far, it is often assumed that higher performing enterprises are more likely to be operated from formal dedicated premises, with full-time employees, well-planned marketing activities and accounting tasks, whereas part-time and home-based businesses are likely to be smaller in scale, less formally managed and achieving lower revenues [11]. Starting and surviving a business is influenced by various socio-economic contexts, whether the business is operated in rural or urban areas [9] [13]. ...
... For example, only five academic papers explicitly investigate HBB owner motivations (see Walker, 2003; Jurik, 1998; 2004; Mason et al., 2011; Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004) with three further contributions from practitioner papers (see Enterprise Nation, 2009; Dwelly et al., 2005; British Telecommunications, 2008). This may be because when considering motivations, the HBB has been likened to self-employment and small business, with Thompson et al. (2009) reporting for their all-female sample of business owner-operators that motivations are similar irrespective of business location. ...

While it is possible to see results from your marketing efforts quickly, the reality is that marketing, especially the type that generates long-term results and referrals, takes time. You're competing in an increasingly crowded and loud marketplace. The better you can connect with your ideal market and develop a relationship with it, the better your results will be. If you provide a great product or service and are attentive to your customers, your customers will provide you with positive reviews, referrals, and testimonials that will help you stand out in the crowd.
... Knowledge-workers use the home as their work location (McDermott, 2005), despite it being often dismissed as limiting network and growth potential (Mason, 2010), with perceived gender links (Mirchandani, 1998(Mirchandani, , 1999), even for 'high-tech' ventures (Wynarczyk and Graham, 2013). Despite a dearth of empirical studies, and regular calls for theoretical develop- ments around this phenomenon (e.g., Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004;Mason et al., 2011;Thompson et al., 2009;Walker and Webster, 2004), home-based, self-employed workers are absent from 'most existing research and theory-building' (Reuschke, 2015, p. 6). We fill this gap by analysing home-based, knowledge-workers' virtual, mental and career mobility; those physical/corporeal restrictions counter-balancing their remote, online home-working autonomy (Fraser and Gold, 2001;Koehne et al., 2012); and the tensions overlooked by extant paradox theorizing ( Smith and Lewis, 2011). ...

... For example, only five academic papers explicitly investigate HBB owner motivations (see Walker, 2003; Jurik, 1998; 2004; Mason et al., 2011; Loscocco and Smith-Hunter, 2004) with three further contributions from practitioner papers (see Enterprise Nation, 2009; Dwelly et al., 2005; British Telecommunications, 2008). This may be because when considering motivations, the HBB has been likened to self-employment and small business, with Thompson et al. (2009) reporting for their all-female sample of business owner-operators that motivations are similar irrespective of business location. ...
Your Brand Persona and Target Audience. When you eventually start creating content, you have to know who you’re talking to and tailor your brand voice to appeal to them uniquely. If you aren’t targeting the right audience (those people who will lean in to hear what you’re saying), you won’t find success. And, if you can’t find a way to stand out, you’ll blend into the hordes of other brands competing for attention in your industry.
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