... In developing countries, commercialized handicraft production is classified as a traditional skill-based activities of a primary producer (artisan) like hand weaving, hand knitting, wood carving or ceramics painting that produce a pretty trinket hand-made items for products in the categories of gifts, house-ware items, home furnishings and fashion goods, that reach the local and foreign market through a number of intermediaries [8]. Previous studies of the factors relating to the management of a small enterprise, whether it is formal or informal production [9] [10], home-based or non-home based [11], or on a part-time or full-time status [12] contend that person's disposition (personality traits) and other external factors in person's surroundings (e.g supportive upbringing, financial situation, family and friends, networking, government support) might have an impact on their performance. So far, it is often assumed that higher performing enterprises are more likely to be operated from formal dedicated premises, with full-time employees, well-planned marketing activities and accounting tasks, whereas part-time and home-based businesses are likely to be smaller in scale, less formally managed and achieving lower revenues [11]. ...
In my experience, one of the greatest challenges people face is deciding why they are starting a business, what they hope to accomplish and what they really want to do. Starting a business, particularly from home, sounds glamorous and free but, in reality, it can put a strain on home life if not done right. People I talk to often need help decision-making which is an essential quality in running a business.

... Así, el emprendimiento puede ser una salida del desempleo o subempleo. Líneas futuras también pueden aproximarse a temas como el emprendimiento desde el hogar aprovechando las posibilidades de las nuevas tecnologías de la información, principalmente para el caso de las mujeres, así como se ha realizado para otros países (Thompson, Jones-Evans, y Kwong, 2009). ...
... To some extent, business processes that enable women to participate in home-based entrepreneurial ventures overcome these barriers . Thus, in contrast to developed countries where homebased working offers poor returns (Thompson et al. 2009), home working offers a solution to restrictions on women's mobility, family responsibilities and a route out of poverty. In Muslim countries, women are considered the repository of family honour, and their chastity and good reputation are valued and guarded (Shaheed 1990). ...
... A more recent study by Tlaiss (2013) finds that rather than either push or pull motivational factors, women entrepreneurs demonstrate a complex interplay of both types of motivation. Other gendered aspects include lifestyle strategies for balancing work and home-life (Breen, 2009/10; Philipps, 2008; Duberley and Carrigan, 2013), feelings of isolation (Greenhaus et al., 2003; Thompson et al., 2009), attitudes to IT (Ndubisi, 2008) and attitudes to growth (Ehlers and Main, 1998; Breen and Karanasios, 2010; Redmond and Walker, 2009/10). We suggest that many of the contradictions of gendered aspects arise from the confounding of different types of home-based business, and would encourage researchers to focus on particular business types, such as our focus on home-based online businesses and the development of the detailed typology shown in Table 1We also suggest that the ease of experimentation offered by the online environment provides an explanation for the low levels of self-efficacy we identified. ...

... To encourage full-time self-employment, which may be particularly relevant for stimulating economic growth (Sautet, 2013;Williams and McGuire, 2010), policy- makers should consider facilitating societal practices related to future orientation and discouraging societal practices related to uncertainty avoidance and institutional collectivism. However, these activities may be neither necessary nor appropriate to also stimulate self-employment activity on a part-time basis, which can be particularly suited to increasing welfare for specific groups of indi- viduals, such as homemakers ( Strohmeyer et al., 2006;Weber and Schaper, 2004) and home-based entrepreneurs ( Thompson et al., 2009;Vorley and Rodgers, 2012). Societal institutional collectivism and uncertainty avoidance are negatively associated with entrepreneurial activity; performance orientation practices are positively associated with entrepreneurial activity. ...
How Much of this Guide Should You Read? This guide is designed for you to read cover-to-cover. Each new guide builds upon the previous one. A core idea that we want to reinforce is that marketing should be evaluated holistically. What you need to do is this in terms of growth frameworks and systems as opposed to campaigns. Reading this guide from start to finish will help you connect the many moving parts of marketing to your big-picture goal, which is ROI.
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